Behavioral Demand Response: How to Really Get Homeowners to Save Energy on the Coldest (and Hottest) Days

Nov. 19, 2014
How can utilities really get homeowners to save energy during periods of peak demand? A new study on behavioral demand response offers some surprising findings.

A March blizzard nearly buried utility poles. Caption jokingly read “I believe there is a train under here somewhere!”
Credit: Collection of Dr. Herbert Kroehl, NGDC

How can utilities really get homeowners to save energy during periods of peak demand? A new study on behavioral demand response offers some surprising findings. The program cost less than traditional demand response, and yet yielded more savings – up to five percent peak reduction. Opower’s Kevin Hamilton explains why in this podcast with energy journalist Lisa Cohn.

Learn the three keys to unlocking DR’s full potential. Download the OPower white paper.

About the Author

Lisa Cohn | Contributing Editor

I focus on the West Coast and Midwest. Email me at [email protected]

I’ve been writing about energy for more than 20 years, and my stories have appeared in EnergyBiz, SNL Financial, Mother Earth News, Natural Home Magazine, Horizon Air Magazine, Oregon Business, Open Spaces, the Portland Tribune, The Oregonian, Renewable Energy World, Windpower Monthly and other publications. I’m also a former stringer for the Platts/McGraw-Hill energy publications. I began my career covering energy and environment for The Cape Cod Times, where Elisa Wood also was a reporter. I’ve received numerous writing awards from national, regional and local organizations, including Pacific Northwest Writers Association, Willamette Writers, Associated Oregon Industries, and the Voice of Youth Advocates. I first became interested in energy as a student at Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, where I helped design and build a solar house.

Twitter: @LisaECohn

Linkedin: LisaEllenCohn

Facebook: Energy Efficiency Markets