Google and Microgrids: Most Read Articles on EnergyEfficiencyMarkets.com

July 2, 2014
Here’s the top 10 most read articles on EnergyEfficiencyMarkets.com in the first half of 2014. Nest, microgrids, carbon restrictions, utility death spiral…these are topics that capture highest interest.. Any unsung stories you think should have gotten more attention? Let us know!

Smart thermostats catch your attention, or at least Nest does. Microgrids interest you too.

That’s what we learned about you, EnergyEfficiencyMarkets.com readers, based on your visits to our site in the first six months of 2014

The most read article for the first half of this year was Google and Nest: What the $3.2 Billion Deal Says about Energy Efficiency Markets. Maybe  it was the whopping price tag Google paid for the learning thermostat in January.

Next in line came not one, but three microgrid stories.

First and foremost, you wanted a clear definition of microgrid. (Us too.) So you made the 2nd most read article So What is a Microgrid, Exactly? This article was published in May as an excerpt from our Think Microgrid guide.

Our story about Eaton’s blackout tracker, 3,236 Reasons for Microgrids, took the spot as 3rd most read article – despite the fact that one reader complained he didn’t open the article because he couldn’t bear to wade through 3,236 points (Trust us, we would never do that to you.)

Next, Massachusetts grabbed your attention with its pursuit of both energy efficiency and microgrids. The 4th  most read article was Massachusetts to Issue Energy Efficiency RFPs and Seek Microgrid and Grid Resiliency.

Not surprising, the Obama administration’s latest plan to cut carbon dioxide emissions took the number 5 spot: What the New Federal Carbon Dioxide Rule Means for Energy Efficiency

After that, the most read articles were:

6. Microgrid for Neighborhoods: How Soon?

7. Microgrids, Money and the Utility ‘Death Plunge’

8. Joule Assets Part I: How to Draw Investors to Energy Efficiency

9. Energy Storage in NYC: This is Not a Test

10. How Do Utilities Make Money in an Age of Energy Efficiency? (Also the fastest trending now)

Thank you for reading and participating in EnergyEfficiencyMarkets.com. We appreciate your enthusiasm and comments.You know where to find us: EnergyEfficiencyMarkets.com or on Twitter@EfficiencyMkts or LinkedIn/Energy Efficiency Markets, LinkedIn/Microgrid Knowledge or Facebook or Google Plus.

About the Author

Elisa Wood | Editor-in-Chief

Elisa Wood is an award-winning writer and editor who specializes in the energy industry. She is chief editor and co-founder of Microgrid Knowledge and serves as co-host of the publication’s popular conference series. She also co-founded RealEnergyWriters.com, where she continues to lead a team of energy writers who produce content for energy companies and advocacy organizations.

She has been writing about energy for more than two decades and is published widely. Her work can be found in prominent energy business journals as well as mainstream publications. She has been quoted by NPR, the Wall Street Journal and other notable media outlets.

“For an especially readable voice in the industry, the most consistent interpreter across these years has been the energy journalist Elisa Wood, whose Microgrid Knowledge (and conference) has aggregated more stories better than any other feed of its time,” wrote Malcolm McCullough, in the book, Downtime on the Microgrid, published by MIT Press in 2020.

Twitter: @ElisaWood

LinkedIn: Elisa Wood

Facebook:  Microgrids

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